Showing posts with label Rosary. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Rosary. Show all posts

Tuesday, April 21, 2020

How to Lead a Prayer Meeting over Zoom



With most of our parishioners in quarantine, it is crucial that we reach out digitally to connect our community. In my role as Pastoral Assistant for Adult Faith Formation at a Catholic parish, I have used the Zoom app to facilitate RCIA, Bible Study, Book Club, Small Church Community meetings, and lots of prayer sessions. We have prayed together the Rosary, the Seven Sorrows Rosary, the Divine Mercy Chaplet, the Angelus, and the Regina Caeli. In this post, I would like to offer some suggestions for leading prayer over Zoom, on the basis of my experience.


Prepare using the following steps:

● To begin, familiarize yourself with the software. Do a practice session or two with a friend or colleague to get the hang of using the app, including the security features and the various ways that people can log in.

● Send out an invitation with detailed instructions for how to access the Zoom session. Let them know of the different ways they can participate, but emphasize that logging in through a laptop or tablet provides the best experience. Remind them that Zoom is a video conferencing software, so they and their immediate surroundings will be seen. (However, there is a way to add a digital background, for those who do not want to use their own home as a backdrop.) Also advise them that the Zoom application picks up ambient sounds, so any side conversations or background noises are likely to be heard.

● In your invitation, send out any prayer materials that you would want the participants to use during the session. Do not wait to give these out over the chat feature once the meeting has started, because some of the participants will not be able to access chat messages easily or at all given their device and their mode of logging in.

● Offer technical support. Many of your prospective participants will not be very tech-savvy. The idea of Zoom might be intimidating for them. However, luckily, Zoom is very easy to learn, even for those with very little mastery of technology. One way you can help is offer to walk people through setting up Zoom on their device. You could schedule individual practice sessions, where you guide them through the set-up over the phone, until they are able to log in to the session.

● You might run into a situation where someone has a video connection through a computer and can hear everything on their end, but might have no built in or external microphone through which they can speak to the group. In a case like this, the workaround is for them to establish the video connection, mute the audio on their computer, and then call in through one of the phone numbers associated with the session for the audio participation. In this situation, it is essential that they turn off the sound on their computer, otherwise you will get an echoing effect.

● If you are planning on repeated meetings, set up a distribution list through which you can send out the login information for your session. Even if the login information is the same as before, some participants will not be able to find your prior email and will need a new invite every time.

● Before the meeting, set up a nice, prayerful background for yourself or select an appropriate digital background. Make sure others who might be living in the same space know of your session, so they will not interrupt. Have everything near that you might need within easy reach, so you don't have to get up during the session, including, depending on the session you are leading, your Rosary, prayer guides, Bible, water, coffee, etc. I know from personal experience that it is easy to forget even the most basic and most frequently repeated prayers while leading a group, so I make sure that I have the text of all the prayers in front of me, including basic ones such as the Our Father and the Hail Mary.

● As far as possible, use a laptop to facilitate the meeting in order to have more options and control as you facilitate. Open any websites you might need, either on your laptop or on your phone. Open the various platforms through which people communicate with you, and have your phone in front of you. People might send you last minute messages asking for help to log in.


Start:

● Say a brief prayer before you start the session.

● Start the meeting on time.

● Welcome people by name as they log in.

● If some participants do not have video capability, read off the names of all the participants.

● Set the Zoom app to gallery view, which provides the best way to oversee the meeting. Encourage others to select gallery view as well.

● Click on the icon for managing participants, which will bring up a list of all those in the session as a sidebar on the right hand side. Having the list of participants displayed will help you later in managing the session.

● If someone has video capability but doesn't know how to turn on their video feed, you can manually send that person a video request, which can help them turn it on more easily.

● Some participants will require a certain amount of technical support as they are logging in, in order to fix some glitches or errors. Use your best judgment as to how much technical support you want to provide in the moment. On the one hand, you want to be inclusive. On the other hand, you don't want to hold the meeting up for too long to solve one person's problems. You might need to suggest politely that you can help the person in question troubleshoot the problem at a later time, after the session.


Check-in:

● Start your meeting with a check-in. I ask the participants the following questions: How are you doing spiritually, psychologically, and physically? What would you like us to pray for? Depending on the situation, I will add other questions, like: What did you do to celebrate Easter in your home? Many people are very lonely during this time of quarantine, and they need a forum to talk about themselves, especially their spiritual life. Do not begrudge participants the time it takes for everyone to check in. For many of them these few minutes might be the highlight of their whole day.

● I find it best for me to call on each participant according to the the order in which everyone appears on my screen. However, sometimes the order can shift a little, because Zoom puts people with a video feed first, then those with audio but no video turned on, and last those who are calling in through a phone connection, so if someone turns off their video even for a brief time, their position in the order of participants will change. To make sure that I didn't miss anyone, I ask at the end of the sharing if everyone has had a chance to share. I always share last myself.


Divide Up the Prayer:

● Zoom does not lend itself to the traditional call and response style of prayer used in the Catholic Church and many other communities. For example, when praying the Rosary, we are accustomed to one person saying the first half of each prayer, and the others responding together. This will simply not work in Zoom, because the app cuts back and forth among the speakers, and if several people are speaking at once, we end up with a jumble of voices.

● The best is to divide up the prayer into sections and have each person say the words for that entire section. For example, when we pray the Rosary, I pray the introductory prayers and the closing prayers, and I read the reflection before each mystery. Then others take turns praying an entire decade, saying all of the prayers of the decade, all the way through. The rest of us either pray in silence or we mute ourselves so that we can say the response out loud, without creating a jumble of sounds.

● At this point, you can also put some prayer materials in the chat, but remember the caveat mentioned above, that not all participants will be able to access chat messages.


Monitor:

● As the prayer leader, it is very important for you to stay focused on everything happening in the session. Also, since most, if not all, of the participants can see your face, you should appear attentive.

● One way to manage audio as the prayer starts is to mute the whole group, and then unmute those who are about to pray. This approach is especially helpful if you have a lot of participants, with a lot of background noise. However, some people dislike being muted, but they are very good about remaining silent, so it's not an issue if they are not muted. Use your best judgment for each meeting as to whether or not you need to mute the whole group, except for the speaker.

● In any case, if not everyone is muted, be ready to mute people individually if their background suddenly becomes noisy, or they start having a side conversation with someone off screen at their location, or they start saying the prayers out loud when someone else is leading. You can always unmute them later.

● Some people might keep unmuting themselves, but you can block this by using the setting that prevents participants from unmuting, leaving that to the host.

● Make sure people are unmuted when they start their section, either by unmuting them yourself or gently reminding them to unmute.

● When the prayer time is over, unmute everyone so there can be some less structured conversation before people log off.

● During the session, keep an eye on the channels of communication through which people usually get in touch with you. Someone who has not yet logged in might send you a message five minutes in, asking for the link to the session. Or someone might text you to say they cannot participate but would like the group to pray for a specific intention.

● As mentioned above, sometimes people forget even the most basic prayers when praying in front of others. As people are praying, be prepared to help someone out if they forget how to say a given prayer. Don't embarrass them. Let them know that it has happened to you too.

● Sometimes the person leading at the moment develops technical difficulties or has to leave because of a problem they need to deal with on their end. Be prepared to jump in to finish off the section.

● If someone has to leave before the session is over, thank them for participating for as long as they could. If they just disappear suddenly, try to message them later to check in with them, just to see if everything is okay.

● If an emergency happens on your end, and you need to step away for a moment, ask someone familiar with the group process to take over for you for a minute. Just remember that they won't have the same controls over the Zoom application as you in your role as the host.


Announcements:

Before you end the meeting, take a moment to make announcements about upcoming opportunities that might be relevant to your group. Invite others to make similar announcements too.


Farewell:

Thank everyone for participating and say good-bye. I usually say something along the lines of: "Thank you all for coming. God bless you. See you next time!" I give people some time to say good-bye. In these last moments, everyone is talking at the same time, with the inevitable jumble of sounds, but it is okay. After waiting a few moments, I click the option for ending the meeting, and we are done.


Follow-up:

After the meeting, follow-up with any participants you offered to help with technical difficulties. If you promised to send out some information or certain resources, make sure you do so. If someone had to leave abruptly, reach out to them. If someone seemed especially distressed, get in touch to see if they need any help. Continue your prayer by praying for all the participants in your session.


Photo Credit: Our Lady over the Earth. Source unknown. This image has circulated widely on the Internet.

Saturday, September 1, 2018

Five Benefits of the First Five Saturdays Devotion


In 1925, Our Lady of Fatima requested a special devotional practice of the faithful, the First Five Saturday Devotion, whereby the faithful undertake to do the following on five consecutive Saturdays in reparation for the outrages committed against Our Lady's Immaculate Heart:
- Go to Confession
- Receive Communion
- Pray five decades of the Rosary
- Mediate for 15 minutes on the mysteries of the Rosary.


I will link to a full description of the First Five Saturday Devotion at the end of this post. Here, I want to talk about the benefits of undertaking this devotion.

1) Reparation: Perhaps the chief benefit of the First Five Saturday Devotion is making reparations for the sins of others, thereby helping them to become more open to God's grace in their lives. It is as if someone were in overwhelming debt, and we quietly paid it off for them, helping them to get a fresh start financially.

2) Our Hour of Death: Our Lady said to Sr. Lucia: "I promise to assist at the hour of death with the graces necessary for salvation." (See link below.) If we are dedicated to the First Saturday Devotion, Our Lady will protect us in the hour of our death.

3) Habit of Regular Confession: Observing the First Five Saturday Devotion is a great way to get into the habit of regular Confession. I would recommend not stopping at five consecutive Saturdays, but to continue the devotion throughout the year. By doing so, we have a structure for going to Confession at least once a month, which is important for advancement in the spiritual life. By going to Confession frequently, we get into the habit of taking stock of our spiritual life, of what we are really doing from day-to-day, rather than what we would like to think we are doing. Frequent Confession keeps us honest with ourselves and accountable.

4) The Blessings of Confession: Confession absolves us from sin and, if we are properly disposed, gives us the grace to change sinful habits that weigh us down and hinder our spiritual progress. Confession is also a powerful tool in spiritual warfare, in that the grace of Confession helps to bind and cast out through the power of Christ the evil spirits that we have let into our lives through our sins.

5) Learning to Meditate on the Rosary: Reciting the Rosary daily is a powerful spiritual practice. But frequent recitation can cause us to say the prayers on autopilot, without much conscious awareness. By taking time at least once a month to meditate for 15 minutes on the mysteries of the Rosary, we can develop the skills we need to continue to engage with each mystery more mindfully during the rest of the month.

The above are just some of the benefits of committing to the First Saturday Devotions requested by Our Lady of Fatima. Many others will, I am sure, become evident upon further reflection. For a fuller description of the history and nature of the devotion, please follow the link below:
The Five First Saturdays Devotion


Photo: The Sanctuary of Fatima, taken on my 2017 trip to Fatima.

Sunday, May 27, 2018

Saying the Favorite Prayer of Our Blessed Mother

The Catholic Church celebrates the Sunday after Pentecost as Trinity Sunday. Perhaps the most succinct and most beautiful prayer to the Holy Trinity in the Catholic tradition is the Glory Be, which goes as follows: "Glory Be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be."

I tend to think that the Glory Be is the favorite prayer of the Blessed Virgin Mary. At Lourdes, Our Lady appeared to St. Bernadette 18 times. During these apparitions, as Bernadette would pray the Rosary in Our Lady's presence, Mary remained silent, except that she joined Bernadette during each Glory Be.

At Lourdes, Our Lady also stated, "I am the Immaculate Conception," which means that she was free of all original sin. The Catholic Church teaches that Mary was also free of all personal sin. Therefore, throughout her whole existence, Mary has never had a thought and has never performed an act that was in any way contrary to God's will. The Virgin Mary's entire existence has been in perfect harmony with God from the moment of her conception.

To be in harmony with God's will means that we fully open ourselves to God's love for us, and we love God with all of our being, with everything that we are, fully, completely, without reservation. Since God is absolute beauty, absolute perfection, and absolute glory, to love God also means that we glorify him, honor him, and praise him constantly, without end.

As in her beautiful poem, the Magnificat, which we find in the Gospel of Luke (1:46-56), Our Lady ceaselessly proclaims the greatness of the Lord, glorifying the name of God. As we pray the Glory Be, we can safely assume that we are saying the words that give our Holy Mother the greatest joy. One day, we will join her in Heaven, where we will find our complete fulfillment in joining her in the eternal praise of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.

Wednesday, February 14, 2018

Seven Sorrows Rosary


The Origin of the Devotion

Devotion to Our Lady of Sorrows has a long history in the Catholic Church. The specific Seven Sorrows Rosary prayer was entrusted to the Church by Our Lady when, in the 13th century, she appeared to a group of men who later formed into the Order of Servites. The devotion has received ecclesial approval and support.

Over the years, Our Lady has encouraged devotion to her Seven Sorrows in various apparitions. In more recent times, in 1982, she appeared in Kibeho, Rawanda, urging us to pray the Seven Sorrows Rosary.

In the Gospel of Luke, the Prophet Simeon states: “Behold, this child is destined for the fall and rise of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be contradicted, and you yourself a sword will pierce, so that the thoughts of many hearts may be revealed” (Luke 2:34-35). As the Mother of God, the Virgin Mary was more connected to Christ than any other human being, and therefore she shared in the suffering of Christ in a unique way. No human being, other than the human nature of Christ, suffered as much as Mary did. Therefore, she understands the depth of our sorrow, and since is she the Mother of us all, she is always eager to help us if we call upon her.


Praying the Seven Sorrows Rosary

Make the Sign of the Cross.

Opening Prayers on the large medallion or cross:

Introductory Prayer: My God, I offer you this rosary for your glory, so I may honor your Holy Mother, the Blessed Virgin, so I can share and meditate upon her suffering. I humbly beg you to give me true repentance for all my sins. Give me wisdom and humility, so that I may receive all the indulgences contained in this prayer.

Act of Contrition: My God, I am heartily sorry for having offended you, and I detest all my sins, because I dread the loss of Heaven and the pains of Hell, but most of all because they offend you my God, who are all good and deserving of my love. I firmly resolve, with the help of your grace, to confess my sins, to do penance and to amend my life. Amen.

One Hail Mary on each of the first three beads, in honor of the tears of the Virgin Mary.

Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.


The First Sorrow: The Prophecy of Simeon (Luke 2:22-35)

Reflection: Mary, being sinless, lived her life in perfect conformity to the will of God. The knowledge that her Divine Son would be rejected and contradicted pierced her heart with anguish. Today Christ continues to be rejected and contradicted in the world, more so than ever before. In our own lives too, unlike our all-holy Mother, we often fail to live in complete conformity with the will of God, succumbing instead to the lure of the world. Let us beseech our Immaculate Mother for the healing of the world and of our hearts.

One Our Father for the small medallion or standalone bead: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

One Hail Mary for each of the seven beads: Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

At the end of the set: Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.


The Second Sorrow: The Flight into Egypt (Matthew 2:13-15)

Reflection: God led the Israelites out of Egypt into the Promised Land. But now the Messiah has to flee from the Holy Land to Egypt. Mary is grieved by the rejection of her son and the suffering he will endure during their escape. She feels anguish for the Holy Innocents whom Herod slaughters in the attempt to take the life of Jesus. Today, many Christians have to flee their homeland because of anti-Christian persecution. More Christians have been martyred in our era than ever before. The faith is forced out of the public square more and more forcefully in our society. After his exile, Jesus returned from Egypt to the Holy Land. May faith in Christ return to our society as well.

One Our Father for the small medallion or standalone bead: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

One Hail Mary for each of the seven beads: Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

At the end of the set: Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.


The Third Sorrow: The Losing of the Child Jesus in the Temple (Luke 2:41-52)

Reflection: As Mother of God, Mary had the singular honor of being with our Lord throughout his childhood. The separation of losing Jesus in the Temple pierces her heart with great sorrow. Jesus teaching in the Temple foreshadows the longer separation they must have in later years when he begins his earthly ministry as an adult. Losing Jesus for three days also foreshadows the three days in the tomb, after the anguish of Calvary. Mary never stopped worshipping Christ during their physical separation. But today, so many in the world do not know Christ and have no knowledge of his healing love. Mary found Jesus after her search. May our society, which, unlike our Holy Mother, keeps searching for answers in futile ways, also come to find Jesus.

One Our Father for the small medallion or standalone bead: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

One Hail Mary for each of the seven beads: Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

At the end of the set: Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.


The Fourth Sorrow: Mary Meets Jesus on the Way of the Cross (Luke 23:27-31)

Reflection: Mary is filled with great anguish at seeing her Divine Son led away to execution, rejected by the jeering crowds. Today, the Church, the Body of Christ, is mocked, jeered at, and persecuted, almost entirely crushed in many lands formerly Catholic. As churches close and faith in Christ is displaced, we share in the grief of Mary, the Mother of the Church. But as Christ rose from the dead, may the Church of Christ experience new life in the face of ever-increasing persecution.

One Our Father for the small medallion or standalone bead: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

One Hail Mary for each of the seven beads: Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

At the end of the set: Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.


The Fifth Sorrow: Jesus Dies on the Cross (John 19:25-27)

Reflection: As the Mother of God, Mary is more closely connected to Christ than any other human being, and thus, she experienced the suffering of Christ on the cross in a unique way. Her suffering was greater than that of any other human, other than the human nature of Christ. Therefore, she knows the anguish of our suffering, and, being our Mother, she is always ready to help us when we call upon her help. Let us always turn to her in our hour of sorrow.

One Our Father for the small medallion or standalone bead: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

One Hail Mary for each of the seven beads: Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

At the end of the set: Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.


The Sixth Sorrow: Mary Receives the Body of Jesus from The Cross (John 19:38-40)

Reflection: Mary’s heart is filled with profound pain as she holds the body of her dead son in her arms. Her prompting of Jesus at the wedding of Cana to start his public ministry has led to this necessary moment. Although she believes in the ultimate triumph of her son over death, for this time, she is filled with sorrow. As we experience loss and death in our own lives, let us bring our sorrows to Mary, who knows our pain.

One Our Father for the small medallion or standalone bead: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

One Hail Mary for each of the seven beads: Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

At the end of the set: Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.


The Seventh Sorrow: Jesus is Placed in the Tomb (John 19:41-42)

Reflection: Who can console a mother who has to see her own son placed in the tomb? The separation foreshadowed by the losing of Jesus in the Temple has come true. Mary, who was granted more time with our Lord in her earthly life than any other human in this world, now has to suffer the anguish of being without him. In our own lives, may we always yearn for the presence of Christ with the same desire that our Holy Mother had. Let us seek him in the good works he enjoined upon us, in the reading of the Sacred Scriptures, and in the Sacraments, especially the Holy Eucharist.

One Our Father for the small medallion or standalone bead: Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

One Hail Mary for each of the seven beads: Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

At the end of the set: Most Merciful Mother, remind us always of the sorrows of your son, Jesus.

Conclusion:

After the Seventh Sorrow, pray the following:

For the holy souls in Purgatory:

Our Father, who art in heaven, hallowed be Thy name; Thy kingdom come; Thy will be done on earth as it is in heaven. Give us this day our daily bread; and forgive us our trespasses as we forgive those who trespass against us; and lead us not into temptation, but deliver us from evil. Amen.

Hail Mary, full of grace. The Lord is with thee. Blessed art thou amongst women, and blessed is the fruit of thy womb, Jesus. Holy Mary, Mother of God, pray for us sinners, now and at the hour of our death. Amen.

Glory be to the Father, and to the Son, and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.

Concluding Prayers: Queen of Martyrs, your heart suffered so much. I beg you by the merits of the tears you shed in these terrible and sorrowful times, to obtain for me and for all the sinners of the world the grace of complete sincerity and repentance. Amen.

Mary who was conceived without sin and who suffered for us, pray for us. (3 times)

Make the Sign of the Cross.


Please note: The pictures in this post are from Google images and are not my own.

Saturday, October 14, 2017

Four Videos to Guide You in Praying the Rosary

Our Lady has asked us to pray the Rosary daily. The following beautiful videos from YouTube can guide you in your prayer. If you are busy with a task that keeps you from using a physical Rosary, then you can play these videos on your phone or tablet to help you pray.








Saturday, October 7, 2017

Rosary Challenge: Pray One Rosary for Each Member of Your Family Every Day



Recently, I was reading a book called The Rosary: Your Weapon for Spiritual Warfare by Johnnette Benkovic and Thomas Sullivan. Towards the beginning, we see a description of a grandmother who would pray a Rosary for each of her grandchildren every day. She had thirteen grandchildren.

The prayerful grandmother gave me an idea. What if we all challenged ourselves to pray a Rosary for each member of our families? What if you prayed a Rosary every day for your spouse, your children, your parents, your siblings each - whoever is in your immediate family?

If the prospect of so much prayer seems daunting, perhaps you could start with just one decade each. Or if even that is too daunting, how about one Our Father, One Hail Mary, and One Glory Be for each of them? If you can’t start big, start small. If you pray with a sincere commitment, sooner or later, you will feel the desire to pray more, and you will find the time to do so.

However we get started, today, on the Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary, let us challenge ourselves to pray the Rosary every day for our families.

Photo: Inside the Basilica of the Rosary in Lourdes by Zoltan Abraham.

For more information on the Feast of Our Lady of the Rosary, read the entries at Wikipedia and the Catholic News Agency.