Showing posts with label Holy Trinity. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Holy Trinity. Show all posts

Wednesday, June 3, 2020

Gospel Reflection - Cycle A - Most Holy Trinity

My weekly reflection on the Sunday Gospel reading. In this video, I reflect on John 3:16-18, the Gospel reading for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity in Cycle A, exploring the following topics:

- As the Easter season comes to an end, the Church is starting our long stretch of Ordinary Time with two solemnities - the feast of the Most Holy Trinity this Sunday and the Body and Blood of Christ next Sunday.
- Overview of the Catholic theology of the Holy Trinity.
- Overview of the theology of the Incarnation.
- The purpose of the Incarnation is twofold: 1) To reconcile humanity with God, 2) to open up a new channel of love for us to experience the love of the Holy Trinity.
- Christ draws us into the inner life of the Holy Trinity.
- The Sign of the Cross is our central symbol of the Holy Trinity.
- The Sign of the Cross shows the integral relationship between the Cross and the love dynamic of the Holy Trinity.
- The self-sacrificial love of Christ is the most profound revelation of God's love for us.
- We are called to the same self-sacrificial love.

You can find the text of the readings for the Solemnity of the Most Holy Trinity in Cycle A at the USCCB website.







Wednesday, May 13, 2020

Gospel Reflection - Cycle A - 6th Sunday of Easter

My weekly reflection on the Sunday Gospel reading. In this video, I reflect on John 14:15-21, the Gospel reading for the 6th Sunday of Easter in Cycle A, exploring the following topics:

- Entering into the eternal love dynamic of the Holy Trinity.
- The commandment of Jesus: Loving each other as he has loved us, even to the point of crucifixion.
- Being grounded in Christ.
- Receiving the Advocate, the Holy Spirit.
- The Holy Spirit is the animating principle of the Church and keeps the Church from falling into error.

You can find the text of the Gospel reading for the 6th Sunday of Easter in Cycle A at the USCCB website.





Wednesday, May 6, 2020

Gospel Reflection - Cycle A - 5th Sunday of Easter

My weekly reflection on the Sunday Gospel reading. In this video, I reflect on John 14:1-12, the Gospel reading for the 5th Sunday of Easter in Cycle A, exploring the following topics:

- We see the divinity of Jesus throughout the Gospels.
- The theology of the Trinity.
- Jesus is the visible presence of the Trinity.
- Jesus is the only way, the only source of true restoration and eternal life.
- Jesus is the Messianic Bridegroom
- Embracing the Cross gives us peace in the midst of suffering

You can find the text of the Gospel reading for the 5th Sunday of Easter in Cycle A at the USCCB website.


Sunday, May 27, 2018

Saying the Favorite Prayer of Our Blessed Mother

The Catholic Church celebrates the Sunday after Pentecost as Trinity Sunday. Perhaps the most succinct and most beautiful prayer to the Holy Trinity in the Catholic tradition is the Glory Be, which goes as follows: "Glory Be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now, and ever shall be."

I tend to think that the Glory Be is the favorite prayer of the Blessed Virgin Mary. At Lourdes, Our Lady appeared to St. Bernadette 18 times. During these apparitions, as Bernadette would pray the Rosary in Our Lady's presence, Mary remained silent, except that she joined Bernadette during each Glory Be.

At Lourdes, Our Lady also stated, "I am the Immaculate Conception," which means that she was free of all original sin. The Catholic Church teaches that Mary was also free of all personal sin. Therefore, throughout her whole existence, Mary has never had a thought and has never performed an act that was in any way contrary to God's will. The Virgin Mary's entire existence has been in perfect harmony with God from the moment of her conception.

To be in harmony with God's will means that we fully open ourselves to God's love for us, and we love God with all of our being, with everything that we are, fully, completely, without reservation. Since God is absolute beauty, absolute perfection, and absolute glory, to love God also means that we glorify him, honor him, and praise him constantly, without end.

As in her beautiful poem, the Magnificat, which we find in the Gospel of Luke (1:46-56), Our Lady ceaselessly proclaims the greatness of the Lord, glorifying the name of God. As we pray the Glory Be, we can safely assume that we are saying the words that give our Holy Mother the greatest joy. One day, we will join her in Heaven, where we will find our complete fulfillment in joining her in the eternal praise of the Father and the Son and the Holy Spirit.