Showing posts with label Adoration. Show all posts
Showing posts with label Adoration. Show all posts

Saturday, April 4, 2020

Holy Week in Quarantine: How to Celebrate the Holiest Season of the Church in Our Homes



The world is about to enter the most surreal Holy Week in living memory. Public Masses are cancelled. Catholic Churches are closed, some entirely, some open only for private prayer for a few hours. But being in quarantine does not mean that we cannot enter into the spirit of Holy Week. Below are some practical suggestions for observing Holy Week in the home.

Livestream: As far as possible, livestream the liturgies of Palm Sunday, Holy Thursday, Good Friday, Holy Saturday, and Easter Sunday. So many churches are livestreaming now, that you will have many to pick from, but preferably watch the broadcast offered by your home parish or diocese or the one from the Vatican. Keep all of these days holy. Don't do any menial work. Don't engage in any form of entertainment that would contradict the spirit of these days. Make sure to observe the fast and abstinence on Good Friday. Traditional, Holy Saturday was also kept as a day of fasting until the Easter Vigil, so you should consider making this a day of self-denial too. Dress up for watching the livestreams as if you were attending the liturgies in person. Participate as fully as you can by singing, saying the responses, and doing the physical gestures.

At Communion time, make an act of Spiritual Communion using the beloved prayer by St. Alphonsus Liguori:

My Jesus, I believe that you are present in the most holy Eucharist. I love you above all things, and I desire to receive you into my soul. Since I cannot at this moment receive you sacramentally, come at least spiritually into my heart. I embrace you as if you were already there and unite myself wholly to you. Never permit me to be separated from you. Amen

If for some reason you are not able to livestream the liturgies, I would still encourage you to set aside a special time each day for Spiritual Communion. You may wish to follow my Guide to Spiritual Communion in the Home as you do so.

Pray: As we celebrate the holiest time of the year quarantined in our homes, set extra time aside for prayer. Pray the Rosary and the Divine Mercy Chaplet every day. Read the Scriptures. Pray especially for the Church to emerge stronger from this time of trial, pray for clergy who are shepherding us through this crisis, for the faithful longing for the sacraments, for the elect and candidates who have been preparing to join the Church at Easter but who will have to wait until a future time.

Making Each Day Special: Unfortunately most of the liturgies that will be livestreamed will not be showing some of the special aspects of the Holy Week liturgies. So perhaps we can recreate some of these special liturgical elements in our homes as best we can. Below are some suggestions for how we can do so, as well as some other ways we can enter into the spirit of Holy Week. Please remember that these suggestion are not meant to be in place of watching the livestreamed liturgies and making a Spiritual Communion, but in addition to them.

Palm Sunday: Place a branch over your door or somewhere prominent on the front of your house. If you don't have palm branches at home, use any branch you can find. Since you can't participate in a procession with palm branches, read the first Gospel of Palm Sunday out loud, then have a small procession with branches of any kind inside your home, while listening to Hosanna songs from YouTube (see suggestions below).

Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday of Holy Week: If you are able to make a grocery run on one of these days, use it to pick up food and drink for your Easter celebration too. If you don't have any Easter decorations, you could most likely pick some up during the grocery run. Or you could use the first days of holy week to make Easter decorations to be displayed on Easter Sunday. Especially if you have kids, quarantine can be a good opportunity for crafts.

The beginning of Holy Week is also a great time to dye Easter eggs. Easter eggs may seem like a secular accretion, but they have Catholic roots. The early Church saw hardboiled eggs as a symbol of the Resurrection, in that the egg coming out of the shell can metaphorically point toward Christ coming out of the tomb. The custom of dying Easter eggs goes back to the Middle Ages, when our Catholic forebearers maintained an extremely strict diet, in which they gave up all animal products, including eggs. For most of Lent, they didn't process the eggs their chickens laid, but as they got closer to Easter, they could hard boil the eggs and set them aside for eating after the Lenten fast was over. During this time of anticipation, they started decorating the eggs, eventually giving rise of a whole new artform.

Holy Thursday: Since the foot washing ceremony is likely to be omitted from the livestreamed liturgies, we can do our own foot washing at home. Married couples could wash each other's feet. Parents could wash their children's feet and vice versa. Not everyone feels comfortable washing someone else's feet, and that is fine. Only those who want to should take part. Also, this foot washing doesn't have to be with soap and abundant water. It can be done symbolically, like at church, by pouring a little bit of water and then toweling it off.

Holy Thursday Mass is also traditionally followed by Adoration of the Blessed Sacrament. Though the Holy Thursday Adoration will not be available, many churches may still be open for private prayer. If possible, try to make it to a Catholic Church for private prayer in front of the Tabernacle (while observing the social distancing requirements of the area where you live). If you cannot go to a church, look for livestreamed Adoration on the Internet, which is available on various websites (see some suggestions below). Alternatively, spend some time in quiet meditation uniting yourself with our Lord in the Eucharist. Pray the Luminous Mysteries of the Rosary by yourself or with your family.

Good Friday: Since we cannot participate in the Adoration of the Holy Cross at church, we can do so in our home. Create a beautiful prayer table in your home, and place the most prominent crucifix you have in the middle. Pray the Stations of the Cross, and then take turns making acts of reverence toward the crucifix.

Holy Saturday: We will not be able to experience the Easter fire and praying in a sea of lit tapers at church this year. But we can try to approximate the experience at home. Gather all the candles you have, whether real or electrical, and spread them out in your living-room in places where you can safely light them. Prepare a home altar in this room. A table, a stand, the top of a dresser, or some other suitable surface works well. Use a nice tablecloth and incorporate some or all of the following: Your Bible, a crucifix, a rosary, sacred pictures and statues, holy water, blessed salt, candles, incense burner, flowers or potted plants, and other appropriate natural objects that can serve as decoration.

Pick one candle that could serve as your Easter candle. If you have a safe place for a fire (in your yard or in your fireplace) light a fire and gather around it. Say some prayers, either from the text of the Mass, or some other prayers, like the Glorious Mysteries of the Rosary. Light your Easter candle from this fire. Then move to your living-room (make sure any outdoor fires are safely extinguished first), and light all the candles you have placed there. Turn off any other lights. Listen to a recording of the Exultet, the Easter Proclamation, from YouTube (see some suggestions below).

Easter Sunday: Put out all your Easter decorations. Display the Easter Eggs you dyed too. Make a festive meal and bring out your best china. Dress in your finest clothes, as if you were going to Easter Mass. During the day listen to alleluia songs (see some suggestions below).

Easter Week: The week of Easter, known in the Church as the Octave of Easter, has traditionally been a time of ongoing celebration. Unfortunately, secular culture has crowded out the sense of the sacred from Easter week. But being in quarantine is a great time to reclaim the holiness of this season. During Easter week, continue to livestream Mass each day. Continue to set aside extra time for prayer, especially the Rosary. Keep using your best china and make your meals as festive as possible.

In fact, the Easter Season continues for seven weeks. Please see my article Seven Weeks of Easter: Suggestions for a Catholic Celebration of Eastertide for how you can continue the festivities until Pentecost.

Post Pictures on Social Media: Take pictures of your celebrations, your decorations, your festive meals, and of your family in your Easter best and post the pictures on social media. Let the world know that you are still celebrating, despite everything. If your parish has social media accounts, try tagging them. You could also ask the people maintaining the parish social media profiles to post pictures sent in by parishioners of their celebrations or to create a hashtag to use for tagging.

Support Your Parish Financially: You might say that this particular suggestion is self-serving because I work for a parish. But the reality is that many churches rely heavily on the Easter donations to meet their financial obligations. During this time of quarantine, many parishes are doing all they can to reach out to their parishioners through digital media, such as livestreamed Masses and Zoom meetings. Priests are also making themselves available for Confession and anointing of the sick to the extent they are allowed by the local quarantine laws in effect. Consider donating to your parish electronically or by mailing in your Easter donation. Consider continuing regular donations, since your parish still has bills to pay.

As this unprecedented time of Easter unfolds, let us pray for one another, and let us entrust ourselves to our Holy Mother, the Queen of Peace.


Sources:

The following article and podcast served as the inspiration for this post:

A beautiful idea for Palm Sunday

How to Do Digital Easter by Divine Renovation


Resources:

Some Hosanna Music from YouTube (there is much more!):

Hosanna in the Highest

Sing Hosanna - Give Me Oil In My Lamp

Hosanna - A Palm Sunday Song


Online Perpetual Eucharistic Adoration


The Exultet in Latin

The Exultet in English


Alleluia Music from YouTube (there is much more!):

Sing Hallelujah

Händel Messiah - Hallelujah Chorus

Alleluia - Mormon Tabernacle Choir


Photo Credit: Christ the Redeemer Statue in Brazil lit up with the flags of the nations as a part of prayers for deliverance from the coronavirus. Photographer unknown. Images such as this are circulating on the Interent.


Wednesday, December 19, 2018

The Ember Days Offer a Sense of Focus Before Christmas



Keeping the Ember Days is an old tradition in the Catholic Church. The Ember Days are four sets of three days of fasting, abstinence from meat, and extra prayers, undertaken during different weeks of the year, known as Ember Weeks, scheduled as follows:
- Between the third and fourth Sundays of Advent
- Between the first and second Sundays of Lent
- Between Pentecost and Trinity Sunday
- During the week following the first Sunday after the feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross, which is held on September 14.

The Ember Days were originally associated with agricultural festivals, and they appear to have developed as the Church sought to Christianize pre-Christian traditions when possible, so that as the people of Europe were converting to Christianity, they could still maintain some of their old customs, now filtered through the perspective of their new faith. As practiced by Christians, the Ember Days had three specific goals: 1) to give hanks to God for the gifts of nature, 2) to teach the faithful to use those gifts in moderation, and 3) to assist the needy. Traditionally, Ember Days have involved fasting and abstaining from meat on the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday of the week in question. Special Masses would also be said on these days. Additionally, the Church developed the custom of performing ordinations during Ember Weeks.

The Ember Days are no longer mandated in the Ordinary Form of the Roman Catholic Church. However, nothing prevents rank and file Catholics from observing the Ember Days as a private devotional practice. The Ember Days of Advent (which this year are December 19, 21, and 22) can be an especially good way of focusing on spiritual priorities just before the celebration of Christmas. Below are some suggestions for how you can observe the Ember Days of Advent:

Fast: Fasting has always been an integral part of Christian spirituality. Fasting helps us to gain a deeper sense of self-control and helps us to reorder our priorities. Fasting is also an essential weapon in spiritual warfare. Regrettably, since the Second Vatican Council, the Western part of the Catholic Church as effectively abandoned fasting as a discipline, leaving only two fast days, Ash Wednesday and Good Friday, when Catholics are obliged to consume no more than one meal, supplemented by two small meals that add up to no more than one full meal, with no snacking outside of these three meals. You might choose to observe the Ember Days by applying these fasting rules to the Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday of Ember Week during Advent. Or you might choose to do more. For example, you might choose to have only bread and water on one of the days. Alternatively, you could have bread and water only on Wednesday and Friday, while applying the less stringent rules on Saturday. Or, if you are experienced at fasting, you might engage in a stricter discipline on all three days.

Abstinence from Meat: If the fasting rules you apply to Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday of Ember Week would allow you to eat a meal with meat in it, take on an additional sacrifice by giving up meat as well. Treat this day as a Friday during Lent.

Prayer: Say some extra prayers on Wednesday, Friday, and Saturday of Ember Week. For example, say an extra Rosary or Divine Mercy Chaplet. Do some extra readings from the Scriptures. If possible, go to Mass on each of these days. Also, if possible, spend time in Adoration at least one of the three days. Go to Confession on the Saturday of Ember Week.

Thanksgiving: List at least five things you are grateful for on each of these three days.

Helping Those in Need: On each of the three days, do something to help those in need. Perhaps a member of your family needs some extra help. Perhaps one of your friends is struggling and could use some sort of assistance. Or help someone you don't know.

If you embrace the celebration of the Ember Days of Advent, and allow yourself to have this altered sense of focus, you can be sure that Christmas will be a much more spiritually fulfilling time, and you will receive an abundance of blessings.

Sources and further reading:

Fr. Alek Schrenk's Thread on the Ember Days

How observing the Ember Days can enhance your spiritual life

Wikipedia Entry on the Ember Days


Photo credit: Forest on the Olympic Peninsula in Washington State by Zoltan Abraham (c) 2018